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2021 House Bill 4434: Cancel state participation in federal $300 supplemental jobless benefits
Introduced by Rep. Lori Stone (D) on March 4, 2021
To require the state unemployment agency to use plain language in communications and determinations sent to employers and benefit claimants, meaning the wording is clear and concise, avoids complex vocabulary and is based on a fourth-grade reading level. This would apply to communications on employers’ taxes and individuals’ benefits, and to the agency’s policies and rules. The bill was later amended to become the "vehicle" for the proposal in the tagline above.   Official Text and Analysis.
Referred to the House Workforce, Trades, & Talent Committee on March 4, 2021
Reported in the House on June 10, 2021
With the recommendation that the substitute (H-1) be adopted and that the bill then pass.
Amendment offered by Rep. Pauline Wendzel (R) on June 17, 2021
To end further state participation in delivering the $300 per week "supplemental" federal unemployment benefits included in a federal "stimulus" spending bill enacted in early 2021.
The amendment passed by voice vote in the House on June 17, 2021
To end further state participation in delivering the $300 per week "supplemental" federal unemployment benefits included in a federal "stimulus" spending bill enacted in early 2021. News reports indicate 25 other states have refused the benefits as of the date of this vote, due to concerns they incentivize people not to work at a time when jobs are plentiful. The bill would also require the state unemployment agency to use clear and concise plain language in communications and determinations sent to employers and benefit claimants, with vocabulary based on a fourth-grade reading level.
Received in the Senate on June 23, 2021
Referred to the Senate on June 23, 2021
Amendment offered by Sen. Paul Wojno (D) on June 24, 2021
To delete a substantial part of the state unemployment benefits law that prescribes rules and administrative procedures related to interactions between state and federal administrators.
The amendment failed 16 to 19 in the Senate on June 24, 2021.
    See Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No".
Amendment offered by Sen. Jeremy Moss (D) on June 24, 2021
To authorize unemployment insurance benefits for employees in a “work sharing” program, in which an employer temporarily reduces employee hours when business is depressed.
The amendment failed 16 to 19 in the Senate on June 24, 2021.
    See Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No".
To end further state participation in delivering the $300 per week "supplemental" federal unemployment benefits included in a federal "stimulus" spending bill enacted in early 2021. News reports indicate 25 other states have refused the benefits due to concerns they incentivize people not to work at a time when jobs are plentiful. The bill would also require the state unemployment agency to use clear and concise plain language in communications and determinations sent to employers and benefit claimants, with vocabulary based on a fourth-grade reading level.
Received in the House on June 24, 2021
Moved to reconsider by Rep. Ben Frederick (R) on June 24, 2021
The vote by which the bill was passed.
The motion passed by voice vote in the House on June 24, 2021
Received in the House on June 24, 2021
Vetoed by Gov. Gretchen Whitmer on July 20, 2021
Received in the House on July 21, 2021
Referred to the House Government Operations Committee on July 21, 2021

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