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2020 Senate Bill 886: Coronavirus epidemic response bills – expanded unemployment benefits

Public Act 229 of 2020

Introduced by Sen. Kenneth Horn (R) on April 24, 2020
To suspend for the duration of the coronavirus epidemic emergency various limits and requirements on state unemployment insurance benefits for layoffs related to the epidemic. Among other things benefits would be payable for up to 26 weeks instead of 20 weeks; benefit payments would not be charged to an employer’s unemployment payroll tax account; workers would not have to seek another job; “work-sharing” plans would be allowed and more.   Official Text and Analysis.
Referred to the Senate Government Operations Committee on April 24, 2020
Referred to the Senate Economic and Small Business Development Committee on May 6, 2020
Amendment offered in the Senate on October 8, 2020
To tie-bar the bill to Senate Bill 911 and House Bills 6101, 6030, 6031 and 6032, meaning this bill cannot become law unless those ones do also. Those bills would extend liability exemptions to businesses and other institutions threatened by lawsuits claiming damages related to their operations during the coronavirus epidemic.
The amendment passed by voice vote in the Senate on October 8, 2020
Amendment offered by Sen. Mallory McMorrow (D) on October 8, 2020
To tie-bar the bill to Senate Bills 995 to 1005, meaning this bill cannot become law unless those ones do also. Those bills are part of a Democratic legislative package that includes some of the same provisions as this bill, but would also make increased benefit amounts and durations permanent, and liberalize other rules in this employer-funded system.
The amendment failed 16 to 22 in the Senate on October 8, 2020.
    See Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No".
Amendment offered by Sen. Curtis Hertel, Jr. (D) on October 8, 2020
To "break the tie-bar" between this bill and Senate Bill 911 and House Bills 6101, 6030, 6031 and 6032, meaning this bill would go into law if enacted even if those ones do not. Among other things those bills would extend liability exemptions to businesses and other institutions threatened by lawsuits claiming damages related to their operations during the coronavirus epidemic.
The amendment failed 16 to 22 in the Senate on October 8, 2020.
    See Who Voted "Yes" and Who Voted "No".
To suspend through the end of 2020 various limits, restrictions and requirements related to collecting state unemployment insurance benefits for layoffs related to the epidemic. Among other things benefits would be payable for up to 26 weeks instead of 20 weeks; benefit payments would not be assessed against an employer’s unemployment insurance account; workers would not have to seek another job while collecting benefits; “work-sharing” plans would be allowed; eligibility restrictions would be eased and more. The bill also clarifies that individuals who are independent contractors were eligible for benefits as of March 15, 2020. The bill is "tie-barred" to other bills extending epidemic-related liability protections to employers and other institutions, meaning it cannot become law unless they also become law.
Received in the House on October 13, 2020
Referred to the House Ways and Means Committee on October 13, 2020
Reported in the House on October 13, 2020
With the recommendation that the substitute (H-1) be adopted and that the bill then pass.
Substitute offered by Rep. Brandt Iden (R) on October 14, 2020
To replace the previous version of the bill with one that revises details but does not change the substance as previously described.
The substitute passed by voice vote in the House on October 14, 2020
Amendment offered by Rep. Nate Shannon (D) on October 14, 2020
To extend the expanded benefits to April of 2021.
The amendment failed by voice vote in the House on October 14, 2020
Amendment offered by Rep. Tommy Brann (R) on October 14, 2020
To tie-bar the bill to Senate Bill 911, meaning this bill cannot become law unless that one does also. SB 911 would allow retired state unemployment bureau staffers to return to work and collect a paycheck along with a pension check, so as to more quickly process benefit claims.
The amendment failed by voice vote in the House on October 14, 2020
To suspend through the end of 2020 various limits, restrictions and requirements related to collecting state unemployment insurance benefits for layoffs related to the epidemic. Among other things benefits would be payable for up to 26 weeks instead of 20 weeks; benefit payments would not be assessed against an employer’s unemployment insurance account; workers would not have to seek another job while collecting benefits; “work-sharing” plans would be allowed; eligibility restrictions would be eased and more. The bill also clarifies that individuals who are independent contractors were eligible for benefits as of March 15, 2020. An earlier "tie-bar" was removed, meaning other bills extending epidemic-related liability protections to employers and other institutions do not also have to become law for this one to become law.
Received in the Senate on October 13, 2020
To concur with the House-passed version of the bill, which among other changes, no longer requires bills extending epidemic-related liability protections to employers and other institutions to become law for this one to become law.
Signed by Gov. Gretchen Whitmer on October 20, 2020

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