Checkmark
Legislation watch

Search all years.

2021 Senate Bill 46: Exempt some developers' “broadband equipment” from personal property tax
Introduced by Sen. Aric Nesbitt (R) on January 26, 2021
To exempt “broadband equipment” owned by certain internet developers claiming to serve "underserved areas" from personal property taxes levied on business tools and equipment. The bill is connected to House Bill 4210, and the Senate Fiscal Agency is unable to quantify the amount of foregone revenue the tax subsidies they promise would cost the state, in part because the bills would permit developers to claim them in areas where broadband internet may already be available.   Official Text and Analysis.
Referred to the Senate Energy and Technology Committee on January 26, 2021
Reported in the Senate on February 10, 2021
With the recommendation that the substitute (S-1) be adopted and that the bill then pass.
Received in the House on February 18, 2021
Referred to the House Communications and Technology Committee on February 18, 2021
Reported in the House on March 9, 2021
With the recommendation that the substitute (H-1) be adopted and that the bill then pass.
Amendment offered by Rep. Abraham Aiyash (D) on March 24, 2021
To require public hearings before the proposed selective tax breaks may be given; require the developers granted this privilege to send a written notice clearly describing the new service to every address in the area covered, and put time limits on the tax breaks.
The amendment failed by voice vote in the House on March 24, 2021
Amendment offered by Rep. Abraham Aiyash (D) on March 24, 2021
To establish that all records related the tax breaks be subject to open records law disclosure requirements; require developers granted this privilege to let customers opt out of having to share personal data; and notify customers of any security breach.
The amendment failed by voice vote in the House on March 24, 2021
Amendment offered by Rep. Abraham Aiyash (D) on March 24, 2021
To establish customer uptake thresholds that if not met would cause the selective tax break given to a developer to be terminated. Also, to require the Department of Treasury to publish detailed information on the exemptions granted under the bill and the amount of foregone property tax revenue they represent.
The amendment failed by voice vote in the House on March 24, 2021
Amendment offered by Rep. Abraham Aiyash (D) on March 24, 2021
To make the proposed tax breaks prospective only, rather than also giving them to developers whose projects were in the works before the start of 2021.
The amendment failed by voice vote in the House on March 24, 2021
Received in the Senate on April 13, 2021

Comments